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Changing of the seasons

With school being back in session, that leaves Lisa and I with a lot more to do.  Ben is in soccer again this year for high school and Katy and Sarah are in their elementary school soccer program.  That leaves Andrew to be my helper when he gets home.

Just this week, we can tell that the next season of fall is upon us.  The soybeans in the area really changed to a golden hue and are starting to drop a few leaves.  The corn is slowing drying down.  Even the caterpillars are on the move.  With all the rain though it makes us wonder what will be next.

It makes us glad that we farm the way we do.  I hate driving by these empty fields where sweet corn was planted only to reveal big gullies where a waterway should have been placed.  They don’t seem to mind loosing the soil or having to pull it back up the hill again.  “Pay me now or pay me later”

Our fields are all built on the contour of the rolling hills.  Although I have to admit it is certainly nice to farm the few level spots we have and just drive straight.  Ben on the other hand hates straight fields because he gets bored when cultivating and wants the challenge.  He is the best cultivator operator I have seen.

We have had another 2.25 inches this week and while everything is wet on our farm, the soil is where it is supposed to be.  Growing good healthy crops.  There is a lot to be said for farming with the soil and nature and not against it.  Mother Nature always wins in the end.  We will be patient and pray for a good crop.

 

Eric and Lisa

Being Non-GMO

There is a lot of debate of the GMO issues around the globe these days.  I for one am very glad that they are becoming a front and center debate.  I have personally watched as the farms around us are 100% GMO and sprayed with roundup.  This is the “easy” button of farming in my opinion.  The large farmers can run more acres faster and easier and by July or sooner, they are still just sitting around waiting for harvest of a single mono crop or sometimes dual crop agriculture.

For us at Hidden Steam Farm, we take a much different approach.  We are constantly in movement taking take of the land and incorporating animals into of total farm.  We grow hay for our grass fed beef cattle.  The hay is about 3 – 4 cutting a year in the summer.  We figure on average we have about 30 days between crops.  We also raise oats or barley for the pigs and we raise our own Non-GMO corn for our hogs and chickens.  We however don’t spray our corn.

People ask why we don’t spray since we are not certified organic.  While organic certification is great, and we could grow and sell it for more money, it is about raising a healthy food source for our animals.  Just as you don’t want your kids to eat a lot of crap food, we want to give our animals the best.  It does require extra labor, fuel and time to get this all done, but we know we are doing our own little part.

 

More to come on why we transitioned to 100%non GMO feed and the hurdles we over came.

 

-Eric

 

Spring almost here

We continue to wait patiently for the warm weather to be a permanent fixture around the farm.  We are all anxious to start our field work and gardens here on the farm.